The Wade Authors in the Blogosphere

Blogs come in a variety of topics and formats. They invite in-depth looks at a multitude of topics, as well as glimpses into the lives and interests of people from around the world. In the case of the Wade authors, there are a number of scholars, enthusiasts, and organizations dedicated to the study of their lives and works that offer some helpful resources delivered via blogs; including the Wade Center (as is evident to you, our readers).

In this post, we will take a look at some of the blogs where the Wade authors are studied and appreciated. This is by no means a comprehensive list! We hope it will serve as a useful starting point to whet your appetite for continued exploration and as a means to learning more about the seven authors of the Wade Center and related subject areas. The following details were gathered from the blogs directly, so if you manage one of the blogs below and have additional or updated descriptions, please contact us.

Have other suggestions for intriguing Wade related blogs? Post them in the comments below!

*Note that we are not including podcasts or general websites in these lists; rather, we are defining a blog as a regular series of textual, date-stamped posts.

 

Along-the-Beam

Image from: alongthebeam.com

BROAD TOPICS & MULTIPLE WADE AUTHORS

These blogs discuss multiple Wade authors and/or related topics.

Diana Pavlac Glyer blog: A blog of intermittent posts from Lewis, Tolkien, and Inklings scholar Diana Glyer. She is Professor of English at Azusa Pacific University.

“I Have An Inkling” blog by Mark Sommer: Posts about news, books, and other topics relating to the Inklings, which included 4 of the 7 Wade authors (Barfield, Lewis, Tolkien, Williams).

“Islands of Joy”: A blog focused on the theme of “Sehnsucht” (meaning joy or longing), which C.S. Lewis wrote about; this deep sense of desire is most often evoked by art, poetry, literature, music, or nature. Several writers contribute to this blog.

“Kalimac’s Corner” by David Bratman: Personal blog of Bratman, a scholar who specializes in Lewis, Tolkien, and the Inklings.

“Letters from the Edge of Elfland” by David Russell Mosley: David has a PhD in theology from Nottingham University and writes posts (“letters”) about theology, creativity, and their places in everyday life. His posts can include content on Lewis, Tolkien, and Chesterton.

“Transpositions”: A blog on theology, imagination, and the arts managed by The Institute for Theology, Imagination and the Arts (ITIA) at the University of St. Andrew’s, Scotland. Several writers contribute to this blog.

 

BLOGS FROM SOCIETIES AND ORGANIZATIONS

C.S. Lewis Foundation: Interviews with C.S. Lewis scholars, information about the Foundation, and words of encouragement. The C.S. Lewis Foundation is based in Redlands, CA.

C.S. Lewis Society of Chattanooga, Tennessee:  Contains news on the Society, and Lewis-related topics and information. Moderated by Rev. David Beckmann.

George MacDonald Society Blog: Posts include Society news and events notices, book announcements, and MacDonald related topics. Moderated by Mike Partridge. The George MacDonald Society is based in the United Kingdom.

Tolkien Society: Publishes Society news and a wide variety of Tolkien related topics. This blog has multiple authors. The Tolkien Society is based in the United Kingdom.

 

BLOG ON GEORGE MACDONALD

“Works of George MacDonald” by Michael Phillips: A website that maintains several “blog” resources under its “Regular Features” and other tab sections, including MacDonald Q&A, information on MacDonald rare book editions, daily devotionals, prayers, blessings, and poems, etc. Phillips is the author of George MacDonald, Scotland’s Beloved Storyteller (Bethany House, 1987), and has adapted MacDonald’s works for contemporary readers.

 

BLOG ON CHARLES WILLIAMS

“The Oddest Inkling” by Sørina Higgins: A blog dedicated to exploring the life, works, and ideas of Charles Williams. The earlier posts on the blog are particularly helpful for an overview of Williams’s ideas and biography. Higgins is in the process of posting overviews of works by Charles Williams in publication order. She serves as Chair of the Literature & Language Department at Signum University’s Mythgard Institute, and is currently a doctoral student at Baylor University.

 

BLOGS ON C.S. LEWIS

“Along the Beam” by Rebekah Valerius: Posts on Lewis and integrated approaches to Christian apologetics. Valerius is a graduate student studying apologetics at Houston Baptist University.

Crystal Hurd blog – Hurd is an educator and Lewis scholar from Virginia. She is currently researching the parents of C.S. Lewis, Albert and Flora Lewis, and her posts focus on books, Lewis, and related topics.

“Dangerous Idea” by Victor Reppert: The personal blog of Reppert contains posts on C.S. Lewis in the areas of reason, science, and philosophy, as well as other topics of interest. Reppert also manages a blog titled “Dangerous Idea 2” and a blog study guide of Lewis’s Mere Christianity. Reppert is the author of C.S. Lewis’s Dangerous Idea: In Defense of the Argument from Reason (InterVarsity Press, 2003).

David Beckmann blog: Personal blog of Rev. David Beckmann and dedicated to helping others learn more about the life and works of C.S. Lewis, with an emphasis on spiritual topics. Beckmann is the founder and moderator of the C.S. Lewis Society of Chattanooga, TN.

“Essential C.S. Lewis” by William O’Flaherty: Provides daily quotes by C.S. Lewis, and includes links to other Lewis-related resources (podcasts and scholar interviews).

“The Lamppost: C.S. Lewis, Narnia, and Mere Christianity” by Will Vaus: Provides information on Vaus’s books, travels, and a variety of Lewis-related topics particularly in the area of theology. Vaus is a pastor, public speaker, and the author of several books about C.S. Lewis and his works.

Mark Neal blog: Personal blog with topics relating to C.S. Lewis, particularly on the function and life of the imagination. Neal is co-author of the book The Surprising Imagination of C.S. Lewis with Dr. Jerry Root (Abingdon Press, 2015).

“Mere C.S. Lewis” by Ken Symes: Covers topics relating to Lewis and politics, apologetics, ethics, and evangelism.

“A Pilgrim in Narnia” by Brenton Dickieson: A blog project in reading and talking about the work of C.S. Lewis and the worlds he touched, including children’s literature, apologetics, myths and mythology, fantasy, theology, cultural critique, and writing, as well as the work of his fellow Inklings J.R.R. Tolkien and Charles Williams. Dickieson is a university lecturer, and freelance writer from Prince Edward Island, Canada.

 

BLOGS ON J.R.R. TOLKIEN

Dimitra Fimi blog: Personal blog of Fimi, who is Senior Lecturer in English at Cardiff Metropolitan University and co-editor of the book A Secret Vice: Tolkien on Invented Languages (HarperCollins, 2016).

“The Flame Imperishable” by Jonathan McIntosh: A theology blog on Tolkien, St. Thomas Aquinas, and related topics. McIntosh is a Fellow of Humanities at New Saint Andrews College, Moscow, Idaho, and teaches courses on the Great Books, medieval thought, Tolkien, and other areas.

John Garth blog: Personal blog on a variety of Tolkien topics, particularly World War I. Garth is a freelance writer, researcher and reader, and a widely-acclaimed Tolkien and World War I scholar. He is the author of Tolkien and the Great War (Houghton Mifflin, 2003).

“Lingwë – Musings of a Fish” by Jason Fisher: Tolkien scholar Jason Fisher provides the following list describing his blog topics: “J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, the Inklings, J.K. Rowling, and fantasy literature in general; language, linguistics, and philology; comparative mythology and folklore.” He is the editor of Tolkien and the Study of His Sources: Critical Essays (McFarland, 2011).

LOTR Project by Emil Johansson: Blog relating to the creative and ambitious web project dedicated to the works of J.R.R. Tolkien, including an extensive Middle-earth genealogy, a historical timeline of Middle-earth, and statistics of the population of Middle-earth. Johansson is a Chemical Engineering student currently living in Gothenburg, Sweden.

“Parma-kenta” by Troels Forchhammer: This blog is maintained by a Danish Tolkien scholar, and contains lists to many Tolkien resources & headlines, as well as posts of varied Tolkien-related topics. A key feature is “Tolkien Transactions” – a review of online Tolkien content that Forchhammer has deemed interesting enough to share with his blog readers.

“Sacnoth’s Scriptorium” by John D. Rateliff: Personal blog of Rateliff, who is an independent Tolkien scholar and author of The History of the Hobbit (Houghton Mifflin, 2007).

“Tolkien and Fantasy” by Douglas A. Anderson: The blog defining itself as “musings on Tolkien and modern fantasy literature.” Anderson is the editor of the books The Annotated Hobbit (Houghton Mifflin, 2002), Tales Before Tolkien (Del Rey / Ballantine Books, 2003), and Tales Before Narnia (Del Rey / Ballantine Books, 2008).

“The Tolkienist” by Marcel R. Aubron-Bülles: Contains a wide variety of Tolkien-related topics by Aubron-Bülles, who is a German freelance journalist and translator.

“Too Many Books and Never Enough” by Wayne Hammond and Christina Scull: Personal blog of Tolkien scholars Hammond and Scull on a variety of topics relating to Tolkien studies. Hammond and Scull are known for their in-depth reference books on Tolkien’s life and works, Tolkien bibliography, books on Tolkien’s artwork, and their work editing Tolkien’s books. Christina is the former librarian of Sir John Soane’s Museum in London, England. Wayne is Chapin Librarian in the special collections department of the Williams College Libraries in Williamstown, Massachusetts.

“Wormtalk and Slugspeak” by Michael Drout: A personal blog featuring various Tolkien topics, Anglo-Saxon and medieval studies, and the study of language patterns in literature. Drout is Professor of English and Director of the Center for the Study of the Medieval at Wheaton College, Norton, MA where he teaches Old & Middle English, medieval literature, fantasy, science fiction and writing. He is the editor of Tolkien’s Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics and the Tolkien Studies journal.

New books for your Summer Reading List

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Summer is here! As we did last year with our summer reading ideas, we put together a few suggestions of some exciting new books for your summer reading list. This year there are an exceptional amount of new and innovative titles covering the works and lives of the Wade authors and those who knew them. For each title below, we list a summary of the book, its expected publication date, and several published titles on related subjects. We hope you find these suggestions engaging, and learn something new. Happy summer (and fall and winter) reading!


Inklings-ZaleskiTitle: The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings: J.R.R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, Owen Barfield, Charles Williams
Authors: Philip Zaleski and Carol Zaleski
Release date and Publisher: June 2015 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Summary: A look into the lives and writings of members of the literary discussion and writing group, The Inklings. An impressive research effort with the final product just over 650 pages, this book is a great read for the invested reader who wants to look deeper into the realm of Inklings scholarship.
Other related works:
The Inklings by Humphrey Carpenter
The Company They Keep: C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien as Writers in Community by Diana Pavlac Glyer


Inklings-DuriezTitle: The Oxford Inklings: Their Lives, Writings, Ideas, and Influence
Author: Colin Duriez
Release date and Publisher: March 2015 by Lion Hudson
Summary: Another contribution this year to Inklings studies, this title by British scholar Colin Duriez. This volume is shorter than the Zaleski work (less than 300 pages), and has less biographical information, focusing on the group itself and accessible for the more casual reader.
Other related works:
The Inklings Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide to the Lives, Thought, and Writings of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Charles Williams, Owen Barfield, and their Friends by Colin Duriez and David Porter
The Inklings of Oxford : C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and their Friends by Harry Lee Poe, photography by James Veneman


BedeviledTitle: Bedeviled: Lewis, Tolkien and the Shadow of Evil
Author: Colin Duriez
Release date and Publisher: April 2015 by InterVarsity Press
Summary: Duriez explores how C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien and other Inklings identified modern warfare as a powerful image of the deeper battle between good and evil. He also considers the ways in which their own experiences in war shaped their writings.
Other related works:
Author talk of Duriez at the Wade Center from April 30, 2015
Tolkien and The Great War: The Threshold of Middle-earth by John Garth
A Morning after War: C.S. Lewis and WWI by K.J. Gilchrist


CSL-poemsTitle: The Collected Poems of C. S. Lewis: A Critical Edition
Author: C.S. Lewis, ed. Don W. King
Release date and Publisher: January 2015 by Kent State University Press
Summary: A new collection of Lewis’s poetry, including many previously unpublished poems, together in a single volume. Includes indices of titles and first lines.
Other related works:
C. S. Lewis, Poet: The Legacy of His Poetic Impulse by Don W. King
– “‘Making the Poor Best of Dull Things’: C.S. Lewis as Poet”
by Don W. King in VII: An Anglo-American Literary Review Volume 12 (see also: volumes 22, 23, 29 for other articles by Don W. King)


a-naked-treeTitle: A Naked Tree: Love Sonnets to C.S. Lewis and Other Poems
Author: Joy Davidman, ed. Don W. King
Release date and Publisher: May 2015 by Eerdmans Publishing Co.
Summary: A collection of poetry by C.S. Lewis’s wife, Joy Davidman, published for the first time. These poems come from the Joy Davidman Papers archival collection at the Wade Center. The Wade also owns all of the books authored by Davidman.
Other related works:
Out of My Bone: The Letters of Joy Davidman ed. by Don W. King
– “Fire and Ice: C.S. Lewis and the Love Poetry of Joy Davidman and Ruth Pitter”
by Don W. King in VII: An Anglo-American Literary Review Volume 22 (see also: volumes 12, 23, 29 for other articles by Don W. King)


JoyTitle: Joy: Poet, Seeker, and the Woman Who Captivated C. S. Lewis
Author: Abigail Santamaria
Release date and Publisher: August 2015 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Summary: An in-depth, critical biography of the life of Joy Davidman Gresham Lewis. Santamaria has spent over a decade conducting comprehensive research on Joy, and this book will be a sizable contribution to the realms of both Joy Davidman and C.S. Lewis scholarship.
Other related works:
A Love Observed: Joy Davidman’s Life & Marriage to C.S. Lewis by Lyle W. Dorsett


Lindop-editedTitle: Charles Williams: The Third Inkling
Author: Grevel Lindop
Release date and Publisher: December 2015 by Oxford University Press
Summary: Another in-depth biography, this one on the life of Charles Williams. Lindop has spent many years tracing biographical sources and this will be an indispensable volume for those wanting to understand the life of Charles Williams.
Other related works:
Charles Williams: An Exploration of His Life and Work by Alice Mary Hadfield
An Introduction to Charles Williams by Alice Mary Hadfield
To Michal from Serge: Letters from Charles Williams to His Wife, Florence, 1939-1945


PilgrimsRegressFinally, for another good summer read, if you haven’t had the opportunity to sit down and enjoy the Wade Annotated Edition of C.S. Lewis’s Pilgrim’s Regress edited by David C. Downing, now is the perfect time!

Need Summer Reading Ideas?

Reading in the Wade’s English garden.

Visitors to the Wade Center often ask: “Where do I start if I want to read books by the Wade authors?” This post will hopefully help in beginning to answer that question, and also give you some ideas to add to your summer reading list. Our seven authors wrote in a variety of genres, but the focus of this list will be on works of fiction. If you want to see lists of other books our authors wrote, the names below link to bibliographies available via the Wade’s website, so check those out too.

OB-SilverTrumpet

THE SILVER TRUMPET by Owen Barfield

Owen Barfield: The Silver Trumpet

A fairy tale for children enjoyed by C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Tolkien’s own children. Lewis recounts in a letter to Barfield dated June 28, 1936 that the Tolkien children liked the story so much they were reluctant to return the book to Mr. Lewis, who had lent it to them. The story rests on the fate of the Silver Trumpet, the symbol of hope and the vibrancy of life for a kingdom and its inhabitants.

 

Father Brown: The Essential Tales by G.K. Chesterton

FATHER BROWN: THE ESSENTIAL TALES by G.K. Chesterton

G.K. Chesterton: The Father Brown Stories

Chesterton’s detection short stories featuring sleuth (and Catholic priest) Father Brown are hailed as classics in detective fiction, and have been adapted into several television productions over the years. They appeared in five original volumes, the first of which is The Innocence of Father Brown, and are available today in various editions. Father Brown: The Essential Tales is a good overview volume to start with to get a taste of the tales. If you are a reader of mystery stories (or even if you are not!), you need to meet Father Brown.

 

Till We Have Faces by C.S. Lewis

TILL WE HAVE FACES by C.S. Lewis

C.S. Lewis: Till We Have Faces

Did you know Lewis wrote other works of fiction besides The Chronicles of Narnia? Lewis considered this novel one of his finest books, and wrote it in collaboration with his wife, Joy Davidman. It is a dramatic re-telling of the Greek myth “Cupid and Psyche,” and explores the nature of love in human relationships. If you are looking for a thought-provoking and rewarding read, this is your book.

 

The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald

THE PRINCESS AND THE GOBLIN by George MacDonald

George MacDonald: The Princess and the Goblin

George MacDonald wrote many fairy tales for children, and this is one of his most well-known and loved. This novel-length tale features Princess Irene, Curdie the miner’s son, and their fight to protect the kingdom from some wicked goblins. The book was a particular favorite of G.K. Chesterton and stands as a classic in the fairy tale tradition.

 

Gaudy Night by Dorothy L. Sayers

GAUDY NIGHT by Dorothy L. Sayers

Dorothy L. Sayers: Gaudy Night

Sayers is one of two Wade authors who wrote detective fiction (the other being G.K. Chesterton), and she also made a name for herself in the craft with twelve detection novels featuring her aristocratic detective, Lord Peter Wimsey. In Gaudy Night (book 11 of the Wimsey books, and book 3 of the 4 books featuring Harriet Vane), Harriet returns to her Oxford college to help solve a series of unfortunate events. This book has love, crime, and academia all in one volume.

Want more detective fiction resources? Audio recordings from an earlier detection book group at the Wade Center are available on our website.

 

The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

THE HOBBIT by J.R.R. Tolkien

J.R.R. Tolkien: The Hobbit

Tolkien’s classic tale for children and adults alike, and a wonderful introduction to his world of Middle-earth. The prelude to The Lord of the Rings in which Bilbo the hobbit, a band of dwarves, and Gandalf the wizard set off to recapture stolen treasure from Smaug the dragon. Even if you have read this book before, why not get a refresher read in before the third and final Hobbit film comes out in December 2014?

 

The Place of the Lion by Charles Williams

THE PLACE OF THE LION by Charles Williams

Charles Williams: The Place of the Lion

One of Williams’s seven novels described as “supernatural thrillers” by T.S. Eliot. In this story archetypes are embodied as gigantic animals roaming the earth, such as the Lion of Strength and the Butterfly of Beauty. Their interactions in the world cause havoc, but also produce engaging insights into the hearts of the humans they encounter. This book was highly admired by C.S. Lewis when he first read it in February 1936, and helped start the friendship between Lewis and Williams.

Remember, these books (and all the others the Wade authors wrote) are available for reading at the Wade Center in the beautiful surroundings of the Kilby Reading Room. Is there a particular edition you are looking for? There is a good chance we have it. Let us know, and we will be happy to pull it for you. Stop by and visit us this summer, either in person or via our online resources.

Happy reading!