Announcing VII Volume 32

We are pleased to announce the release of VII Volume 32, the Wade Center’s annual journal. Beginning with this issue, the title of our publication has changed from Seven: An Anglo-American Literary Review to VII: Journal of the Marion E. Wade Center. (See the end of this post for more on the name change.) This volume of VII highlights influences on the Wade authors, particularly the importance of family, friendship, and career background. Crystal Hurd provides new insight and background information on C.S. Lewis’s relationship with his father, Albert Lewis. William Howard takes a closer look at the supportive friendship between George MacDonald and Lady Byron, the wife of poet Lord Byron. And Christine Fletcher examines Dorothy L. Sayers’s career in the advertising industry.

The relationship Albert Lewis had with his sons Warren (Warnie) and Clive (Jack) was complex, as is a common occurrence between parents and children. Albert’s good intentions as a father were sometimes misunderstood and often poked fun at by his two sons. In her profile on Albert Lewis, Crystal Hurd analyzes Albert’s motivations and the mid-Victorian tendencies that influenced his parenting. She explores several misunderstandings that caused Jack to have little affection for his father, including Albert’s choice of boarding school for Jack, his lack of visits during Jack’s wartime leave during WWI, and other father-son issues.

Warren, Albert, and C.S. Lewis, ca. 1908.

Warren, Albert, and C.S. Lewis, ca. 1908.

Hurd takes a look at a previously unpublished transcription of Albert’s sayings from the Wade’s C.S. Lewis manuscript collection (CSL / MS-94) as captured and caricatured by Warnie and Jack. The collection of sayings was titled The Pudaita Pie by the Lewis brothers, and refers to Albert’s “low” Irish pronunciation of the word “potato” (Kilby and Mead 8). It contains 100 personal and anecdotal comments gathered by both sons over the course of eight years along with an introduction by C.S. Lewis. The collection provides further insight into Albert’s personality, including his tendency to speak in confident statements on both trivial and significant matters:

33. Albert once pronounced that Birmingham was one of the most beautiful cities in England. However, when asked if he had ever visited, he replied he had not. (Paraphrase of statement inscribed by C.S. Lewis)

44. On hearing of any civil commotions, his usual comment was: “Aye! Well a whiff of grapeshot would soon settle that.” (Warren Lewis = inscriber)

In William Howard’s piece, he examines the origins of George MacDonald’s friendship with Lady Byron. His article relates MacDonald’s reaction to an account of the disintegration of the Byrons’ marriage presented to the press upon her death in 1860. Howard illuminates the touching nature of MacDonald’s friendship to Byron during a trying time. Howard also provides context into how Lady Byron’s other friends, including Harriet Beecher Stowe, reacted to the ending of the Byrons’ marriage.

Christine M. Fletcher guides us through Sayers’s advertising career and shows us how it influenced her ideas on creativity, good work, and the dangers of consumerism. This experience in the advertising industry was formative in the life of Dorothy L. Sayers. It not only helped provide financial support for the young writer, but it was also part of the world she created in her detective novels. (Dr. Fletcher’s talk given at the Wade Center in 2013 on “Theology in Wartime: Dorothy L. Sayers and C.S. Lewis” is also available on our website.)

Volume 32 also includes other articles on Lewis, Williams, and the Inklings. Remembrances in the issue honor Dr. Barbara Reynolds, a founding editor of VII; David Gresham, C.S. Lewis’s stepson; David Neuhouser, founder of the Center for the Study of C.S. Lewis and Friends at Taylor University; and Bruce L. Edwards, a foremost Lewis scholar and a mentor to many.

VII also celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Wade Center with the poem specially written by poet Luci Shaw to commemorate this milestone in the life of the Wade. Several photos from the celebration on October 29 accompany the poem.

vii-newcoverThe longtime VII reader will also note the updated subtitle of the journal. As scholarship on the seven Wade authors has grown and deepened over the past half century, there has been increased interest in the works of these authors worldwide. When Dr. Clyde S. Kilby, Dr. Barbara Reynolds, and Dr. Beatrice Batson founded VII in 1980, the majority of work being done on these authors was coming from Great Britain and the United States. The desire at that time was to strengthen ties between these groups of scholars, hence the name VII: An Anglo-American Literary Review. However, now with an increasingly international readership in mind, the subtitle no longer applies; thus, as of this volume of VII, the name was changed to VII: Journal of the Marion E. Wade Center in order to more adequately reflect the truly global readership and scholarship on these seven authors.

Please visit the VII website for more information about this volume and back issues. Note that beginning with Volume 31, VII is now available for purchase online.

Rates:
Individual (bought at Wade Center): $14.00 (plus tax)
Individual (shipped in U.S.): $18.00
Individual (shipped International): $29.00
Libraries (U.S.): $35
Libraries (International): $50

Works Cited:
Kilby, Clyde S., and Marjorie Lamp Mead. Brothers and Friends: The Diaries of Major Warren Hamilton Lewis. New York: Ballantine, 1988.

Introducing VII Volume 31

“Where do dragons come from? The origin of myths is We must answer that we do not know.”

These lines, handwritten in one of C.S. Lewis’s notebooks, are, to author and Lewis scholar Dr. Charlie Starr, one more piece in the puzzle of how Lewis grew from a young atheist into one of the twentieth century’s most articulate and ardent apologists for the Christian faith. These lines and their larger context form one of two manuscript fragments Starr has transcribed from this particular notebook of Lewis’s, a complete copy of which is held at the Wade Center. The fragments have been published for the first time in the most recent volume (31) of the Wade Center’s journal VII: An Anglo-American Literary Review. For several years in a row, VII has been privileged to bring a number of previously unpublished pieces of Lewis’s writing into publication through the hard work of scholars who have discovered them among Lewis’s papers held at the Wade Center and painstakingly transcribed and analyzed their contents.

VII volume 31

VII Volume 31

But unlike the 30th anniversary volume of VII (2013), which featured mostly articles on C.S. Lewis in commemoration of the 50th anniversary year of his death, Volume 31 has a more comprehensive range, featuring articles on five of the seven Wade authors: G.K. Chesterton, C.S. Lewis, Dorothy L. Sayers, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams.

Charles Williams in 1935. Image not to be used without permission of the Wade Center.

Charles Williams in 1935. Image not to be used without permission of the Wade Center.

Here we are pleased to offer a brief excerpt from the article “ ‘It Can be Done, You Know’: The Shape, Sources, and Seriousness of Charles Williams’s Doctrine of Substituted Love,” written by Andrew C. Stout. We find that visitors to the Wade and readers of VII are often less familiar with Charles Williams than with the other Wade authors, in spite of his acuity as a novelist and his influence on and friendship with C.S. Lewis. We are pleased to publish scholarship on Williams in VII, in hopes that it will direct more readers to the rich literature this Inkling produced. May the following excerpt from Volume 31 whet your appetite!

“ ‘I am serious about the novel—a new strange fantasy in a new style’ (qtd. in Hadfield 142). So Charles Williams commented in a letter to a friend while writing Descent into Hell. One might wonder if Williams would excuse those readers who do not take him completely seriously in their first reading of the novel. Considered by most to be the best executed of his seven novels, Descent into Hell includes at least one of his strangest ideas—that of ‘substituted love’. . . .

“Descent into Hell tells the story of the inhabitants of Battle Hill, a fictional London suburb. The first person we are introduced to is Peter Stanhope, a successful playwright. Stanhope meets Pauline Anstruther . . . at a meeting of the community’s dramatic society. . . . A sense of fear and dread hangs around Pauline from her introduction, and we soon learn the source of her anxiety—her increasingly frequent encounters with an exact image of herself, a doppelganger. As Stanhope and Pauline’s acquaintance deepens, she finds herself expressing her fear to him.

“After learning of the constant state of dread in which Pauline lives, Stanhope asks why she has not asked a friend to ‘carry her fear.’ Pauline initially dismisses Stanhope’s odd suggestion as a misunderstanding, but he presses her. . . .

“As Stanhope extends his offer and makes his meaning plain, Pauline begins to realize just how serious he is about the proposal. ‘She looked at him as if she were beginning to understand that at any rate he thought he was talking about a reality . . .” (97; emphasis mine). Along with Pauline, we begin to see just how serious Stanhope is about his unusual suggestion. His offer to take up her burden of fear has nothing of the metaphorical about it, but is rather spoken of as a real exchange that could take place between the two of them.”

Works Cited:

Hadfield, Alice Mary. Charles Williams: An Exploration of His Life and Work. New York/Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983.

Williams, Charles. Descent into Hell. A Charles Williams Reader. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000. 3-222.

Please visit the VII website for more information about this volume, and note that VII is available for purchase online for the first time!

Rates:

Individual (bought at Wade Center): $14.00 (plus tax)
Individual (shipped in U.S.): $18.00
Individual (shipped International): $29.00
Libraries (U.S.): $35
Libraries (International): $50