Introducing VII Volume 31

“Where do dragons come from? The origin of myths is We must answer that we do not know.”

These lines, handwritten in one of C.S. Lewis’s notebooks, are, to author and Lewis scholar Dr. Charlie Starr, one more piece in the puzzle of how Lewis grew from a young atheist into one of the twentieth century’s most articulate and ardent apologists for the Christian faith. These lines and their larger context form one of two manuscript fragments Starr has transcribed from this particular notebook of Lewis’s, a complete copy of which is held at the Wade Center. The fragments have been published for the first time in the most recent volume (31) of the Wade Center’s journal VII: An Anglo-American Literary Review. For several years in a row, VII has been privileged to bring a number of previously unpublished pieces of Lewis’s writing into publication through the hard work of scholars who have discovered them among Lewis’s papers held at the Wade Center and painstakingly transcribed and analyzed their contents.

VII volume 31

VII Volume 31

But unlike the 30th anniversary volume of VII (2013), which featured mostly articles on C.S. Lewis in commemoration of the 50th anniversary year of his death, Volume 31 has a more comprehensive range, featuring articles on five of the seven Wade authors: G.K. Chesterton, C.S. Lewis, Dorothy L. Sayers, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams.

Charles Williams in 1935. Image not to be used without permission of the Wade Center.

Charles Williams in 1935. Image not to be used without permission of the Wade Center.

Here we are pleased to offer a brief excerpt from the article “ ‘It Can be Done, You Know’: The Shape, Sources, and Seriousness of Charles Williams’s Doctrine of Substituted Love,” written by Andrew C. Stout. We find that visitors to the Wade and readers of VII are often less familiar with Charles Williams than with the other Wade authors, in spite of his acuity as a novelist and his influence on and friendship with C.S. Lewis. We are pleased to publish scholarship on Williams in VII, in hopes that it will direct more readers to the rich literature this Inkling produced. May the following excerpt from Volume 31 whet your appetite!

“ ‘I am serious about the novel—a new strange fantasy in a new style’ (qtd. in Hadfield 142). So Charles Williams commented in a letter to a friend while writing Descent into Hell. One might wonder if Williams would excuse those readers who do not take him completely seriously in their first reading of the novel. Considered by most to be the best executed of his seven novels, Descent into Hell includes at least one of his strangest ideas—that of ‘substituted love’. . . .

“Descent into Hell tells the story of the inhabitants of Battle Hill, a fictional London suburb. The first person we are introduced to is Peter Stanhope, a successful playwright. Stanhope meets Pauline Anstruther . . . at a meeting of the community’s dramatic society. . . . A sense of fear and dread hangs around Pauline from her introduction, and we soon learn the source of her anxiety—her increasingly frequent encounters with an exact image of herself, a doppelganger. As Stanhope and Pauline’s acquaintance deepens, she finds herself expressing her fear to him.

“After learning of the constant state of dread in which Pauline lives, Stanhope asks why she has not asked a friend to ‘carry her fear.’ Pauline initially dismisses Stanhope’s odd suggestion as a misunderstanding, but he presses her. . . .

“As Stanhope extends his offer and makes his meaning plain, Pauline begins to realize just how serious he is about the proposal. ‘She looked at him as if she were beginning to understand that at any rate he thought he was talking about a reality . . .” (97; emphasis mine). Along with Pauline, we begin to see just how serious Stanhope is about his unusual suggestion. His offer to take up her burden of fear has nothing of the metaphorical about it, but is rather spoken of as a real exchange that could take place between the two of them.”

Works Cited:

Hadfield, Alice Mary. Charles Williams: An Exploration of His Life and Work. New York/Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983.

Williams, Charles. Descent into Hell. A Charles Williams Reader. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000. 3-222.

Please visit the VII website for more information about this volume, and note that VII is available for purchase online for the first time!

Rates:

Individual (bought at Wade Center): $14.00 (plus tax)
Individual (shipped in U.S.): $18.00
Individual (shipped International): $29.00
Libraries (U.S.): $35
Libraries (International): $50

February Artifact of the Month: First edition of Lewis’s “The Four Loves,” a post by Elaine Hooker

It’s February. Images and messages about love are everywhere as Valentine’s Day approaches. Fittingly, the First British edition of C.S. Lewis’s The Four Loves is our February “Artifact of the Month.” This somewhat lesser known work by Lewis includes his own insights into various aspects of love, and was written with help from his wife, Joy Davidman Lewis. However, Lewis’s thoughts on love began to take shape long before Joy came into his life.

First edition of THE FOUR LOVES (London: Geoffrey Bles, 1960).

First edition of THE FOUR LOVES (London: Geoffrey Bles, 1960).

On May 4th, 1940, in the midst of World War II in Britain, C.S. Lewis wrote in a letter to his brother Warren, “I pray every night for the people I am most tempted to hate or despise … and in the effort to make this real I have had to do a good deal of thinking.”

Lewis then goes on to outline his thoughts on love, many of which form a framework for what was eventually included in his book The Four Loves published two decades later in 1960.

In this volume, Lewis categorizes love into four distinct types: affection — or in Greek, storge (pronounced store-gay), friendship — philia in the Greek, eros — sexual love, and charity, or agape (in his May 4 th letter to Warren, Lewis notes that agape was hardly used in classical Greek, calling it “a new word for a new thing.)”

In much of The Four Loves, Lewis argues against the idolatry of erotic love and of family love, which he calls “the great error” of 19th century literature, also saying: “Browning, Kingsley and Patmore sometimes talk as if they thought that falling in love was the same thing as sanctification.” (Four Loves, Introduction) Lewis encourages us to broaden our understanding and practice of love away from narrow cultural proclivities.

In early reviews of The Four Loves, Lewis was praised for his erudite thinking and compelling articulation of the four types of love. The chapter on friendship is especially strong. Lewis points out our modern tendency to ignore friendship, calling it the “least natural” of the loves and the least necessary, while also pointing out its intrinsic value:

“Friendship is unnecessary, like philosophy, like art, like the universe itself (for God did not need to create). It has no ‘survival value’ rather it is one of those things which give value to survival .” (Four Loves, Chapter IV)

The Four Loves is dedicated to Chad Walsh, who was then a professor of English at Beloit College in Wisconsin, an Episcopal priest, and one of Lewis’ earliest American correspondents. Walsh began writing to Lewis in 1945 to praise him for his novel Perelandra. This initial letter marked the beginning of a long friendship that later led to Lewis’s introduction to Joy Davidman (this letter is now part of the Chad Walsh Collection at the Wade Center). After meeting through Walsh’s encouragement, Joy and Jack became friends, and were eventually married in a civil ceremony in 1956 and again by a priest in 1957 when Joy was bedridden with bone cancer. You can read more about this relationship in former Wade Director Lyle Dorsett’s book And God Came In.

The British first edition of The Four Loves was published by Geoffrey Bles on March 28th, 1960. The next month, Joy and Jack Lewis took a final trip together to Greece. They planned the trip before receiving word of a recurrence of Joy’s bone cancer, which had previously gone into remission. Joy died just a few months after returning from this trip on July 13th, 1960. The American edition of The Four Loves , to which Joy held the copyright, was published on July 27th.

Publishing agreement for the US edition of THE FOUR LOVES, signed by Joy Davidman (Helen Joy Lewis). Dated February 2, 1960. From the Joy Davidman Papers, Folder 17.

Publishing agreement for the US edition of THE FOUR LOVES, signed by Joy Davidman (Helen Joy Lewis). Dated February 2, 1960. From the Joy Davidman Papers, Folder 17.

This publishing agreement is housed in the Joy Davidman Papers, along with many other materials relating to Joy’s own writing career, and is available for viewing at the Wade Center.

The Wade Center also holds a copy of a British first edition inscribed in August of 1960 by C.S. Lewis to Bill Gresham, Joy’s former husband.

Inscription from C.S. Lewis to Bill Gresham, August 1960.

The Four Loves is believed to be one of several works that Joy helped Lewis write, and their relationship certainly shaped his understanding and experience of love. He briefly describes the surprising turns their relationship took in a letter to Dom Bede Griffiths on September 24th, 1957 saying:

“It is nice to have arrived at all this by something which began in Agape, proceeded to Philia, then became Pity, and only after that Eros. As if the highest of these, Agape, had successfully undergone the sweet humiliation of an incarnation.”

Joy's plaque at the Oxford Crematorium.

Joy’s plaque at the Oxford Crematorium, with a poem by C.S. Lewis.

Related resources:

Dorsett, Lyle W. A Love Observed: Joy Davidman’s Life & Marriage To C.S. Lewis. Wheaton, Ill. : Harold Shaw Publishers, 1998. (former title: And God Came In) Call number: PS3507.A6659 Z6 1991

Lewis, C. S. Reinforcing The Spiritual Outreach Of The Church: A Series Of Ten Radio Talks On Love. Atlanta, Ga. : The Episcopal Radio-TV Foundation, ©1959. Call number: BV4639 .L45 R4 1959

Lewis, C. S. Four Talks On Love. Atlanta, Ga. : The Episcopal Radio-TV Foundation, ©1970.
Sound recording of Lewis’s voice. Call number: CSL-V / SR-10

Sibley, Brian. Through The Shadowlands: The Love Story Of C.S. Lewis And Joy Davidman. Grand Rapids, Mich. : Revell, 2005. Call number: PR6023.E926 Z8481 1985

Shadowlands by William Nicholson. Adapted into a television movie in 1985 and a film in 1993. Call numbers: CSL-D / VR-2 and 6.

January Artifact of the Month: 1977 Video of Barfield and Kilby

Continuing the celebration of our 50th Anniversary year, we are featuring a video of Clyde S. Kilby, founder of the Wade Center, and Owen Barfield recorded at Wheaton College on November 3, 1977.

The video is an edited version of the full 37-minute recording by Lord & King Associates, which is held at the Wade Center under call number: CSL-Y / VR-16.

In the video, Kilby begins by showing Barfield the Wade’s recently acquired Lewis Family Wardrobe on display in the Wade Center’s Reading Room, which at that time was housed on the 2nd floor in the Nicholas Wing of Wheaton College’s Buswell Library. Although Kilby states that the maker of the wardrobe is uncertain, it was later confirmed that this wardrobe was handmade by Richard Lewis, C.S. Lewis’s paternal grandfather sometime in the 1800s. The wardrobe stood for many years in the Lewis family home of Little Lea in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and was later transported to C.S. Lewis’s adult home, “The Kilns,” in England.  Along with Lewis’s writing desk, chair, and dining table, the wardrobe was purchased at auction in Banbury, England, on October 30, 1973 after Warren Lewis’s death.

Kilby then shows Barfield a copy of The Silver Trumpet, Barfield’s fairy tale for children that was enjoyed by C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Tolkien’s children. The story rests on the fate of the Silver Trumpet, the symbol of hope and the vibrancy of life for a kingdom and its inhabitants.

After being seated by the Reading Room fireplace, Barfield and Kilby discuss Barfield’s decades long friendship with C.S. Lewis. The video concludes with a brief excerpt from the beginning of Barfield’s lecture, titled “C.S. Lewis: Truth and Imagination,” which was given later that evening in Edman Chapel on Wheaton College’s campus. Barfield’s talk, the third annual Wade Lecture, is available on sound recording at the Wade Center, call number: OB-V / SR-11.

Owen Barfield visited Wheaton College several times between 1964 and 1977, and was the only one of the seven Wade authors to come to Wheaton and see the Wade’s collection. The many interesting connections between Barfield, the Wade Center, and Wheaton College are outlined in a chronology on the Wade Center’s website. The Wade also has three Oral History interviews with Barfield recorded between 1983 and 1985.

As we begin the commemoration of our 50th year, we are delighted to share this video and the intriguing glimpse it gives into the Wade Center’s past. To watch the recording in full, or use any of the other recordings mentioned in this post, please visit our Reading Room. We would love to see you!

Celebrating 50 Years of the Wade Center: 1965-2015

The Seven Wade Authors

Happy New Year to all! This is an especially exciting year at the Marion E. Wade Center as we are celebrating our 50th Anniversary.

The story of the Wade began with Wheaton College English professor Clyde S. Kilby. Greatly impacted by the books of C.S. Lewis, Kilby began a correspondence with Lewis in the 1950s. Following Lewis’s death in 1963, Kilby was inspired to begin “The C.S. Lewis Collection,” a repository that eventually would include not only Lewis items, but also materials from six other like-minded British writers. Kilby’s proposal for the collection was accepted by the Wheaton College Library Committee in 1965, and thus began our now 50 years of history filled with wonderful relationships, life-changing literature, and pivotal acquisitions. All of these have helped form the world-class research collection—along with a museum and various educational endeavors such as publications and programming—that the Wade has become today.

Clyde S. Kilby, founder of the Wade Center

Clyde S. Kilby, founder of the Wade Center

Over 50 years, the Wade Center has moved house a number of times between Wheaton College’s Buswell Library, the English Department in Blanchard Hall, and then into our current facility in 2001. In 1974, friends and family members of Christian businessman and C.S. Lewis enthusiast Marion E. Wade began an endowment following Mr. Wade’s death in 1973. The Lewis Collection was then renamed “The Marion E. Wade Collection,” and the name changed officially to “The Marion E. Wade Center” in 1987 to reflect our broader purpose.

Wade Center Reading Room in Buswell Library. You can see the Lewis Family Wardrobe, and off to the right, C.S. Lewis's dining room table.

Wade Center Reading Room in Buswell Library, ca. 1975. You can see the Lewis Family Wardrobe, and off to the right, C.S. Lewis’s dining room table — then serving as a as a table for researchers (it can now be viewed in the Wade Center’s museum).

Our annual journal, VII: An Anglo-American Literary Review, started in 1980 under the guidance of Barbara Reynolds of Cambridge, England, Clyde S. Kilby, founder of the Wade Center, and Beatrice Batson, at that time Chair of the Wheaton College English Department. The journal has just released its 31st volume, and continues to produce in-depth and lively discussion on the seven Wade authors through peer reviewed articles, news and events, and book reviews.

To date, the Wade Center has had three Directors: Clyde S. Kilby, Lyle W. Dorsett, and Christopher W. Mitchell. Associate Director Marjorie Lamp Mead has been here supporting all three directors, and continues to serve at the Wade Center today along with the rest of the Wade’s dedicated staff members. We look forward to continuing the legacy of helping others to enjoy and benefit from the writings and thoughts of our seven authors by building relationships, offering programming and educational opportunities featuring the lives and works of our authors, and supporting research and scholarship on these seven significant writers.

Anniversary Year Items of Note:

  • Construction on the Wade’s 100-seat auditorium has begun! Work started on December 15th, and the Bakke Auditorium is expected to be complete by the fall of 2015. Construction photos available on our Facebook page.
  • Watch for a display commemorating the 50 years of the Marion E. Wade Center in the Wade’s Museum.
  • A special issue of Christian History magazine to be published in 2015 on the seven Wade authors.
  • We have some exciting events planned as well. Stay tuned to this blog, and the Wade’s website and Facebook page for upcoming notifications of these events! Please contact us if you would like to be added to our email list.
Dr. Jill Peláez Baumgaertner

Dr. Jill Peláez Baumgaertner

We leave our readers with a poem by Dr. Jill Peláez Baumgaertner, Professor of English and Dean of Humanities and Theological Studies at Wheaton College. The poem was commissioned by the Wade Center in celebration of the opening of its new building in 2001, and was written while Dr. Baumgaertner was at Oxford with the Wheaton in England program in the summer of 2001. She reflects on the poem’s composition:

The poem begins with one of my earliest memories: my grandmother teaching me to read at age 3. I was asked to write a poem about a building holding the collections of the Inklings, but the poem was about much more than a building or the Inklings. It was about the experience of reading through the years—eventually tied intimately to the Wade Center in its early sites and later in the elegant home of its current housing. Then I reached forward, Whitmanesque, imagining the Wade Center in the future—maybe one hundred years from now. All of this because literature is timeless, and we are made custodians of all that is precious in written language.

The poem appeared in Dr. Baugaertner’s recently published book: What Cannot Be Fixed (Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2014), and she has graciously allowed it to appear here as a wonderful reflection back on the Wade’s history and legacy, and as an appropriate look ahead to our 50th anniversary year and beyond.

Where Words Regain Their Meaning

 I.

Florida: 1951

The child you once were
sits on the porch swing in the heat
weighted with summer rain.
Grandmother points to each word.
You repeat, “Good morning, Baby.
Good morning, Baby Ray.”
And the longing is unlatched,
the hunger for words that transcend
the world locked into the safety
of Mother’s lunches,
of Father’s Saturday mornings,
of Grandmother’s books stacked
beneath her bed or behind glass doors.

Behind the barriers of ciphers
marching across a page the mysteries
are revealed with your first mouthing
of consonants crisped by unfamiliarity
and vowels forcing the syllables
into language which becomes more than speech.
This is your first transcendence.

 II.

Buswell Library: 1995

Books from the Wade's collections.

Books from the Wade’s collections.

The pleasant mustiness of old books,
the stiffened bindings of the new
and the smell of ink, paper, glue,
and you have found your way again.
The college stacks, the secluded
carrels, the whisper-squeak
of the librarian’s cart.

Up the back stairs into the room
called Kilby, quiet with the hush
of study, the scratch of pen, the click
of laptop keys, a muffled rattle of ideas.

This is the place where words regain
their meaning, the books —Tolkien,
Chesterton — packed in like bricks —
Sayers, Lewis, MacDonald —
and parked on tabletops — Barfield,
Williams. Occasionally, a spray
of dust-moted sun
and through the windows a glimpse
of the unwritten world outside these words.

You have missed entire seasons
inside such spaces (the ripening of summer,
the blazing of fall), besotted with words,
breaking print into patterns,
tracing images, wrestling language
amidst the undiscipline of marginalia
in rooms like this filled with the whisperings
of words, not words that fall back inside
themselves like ice on a thawing pond,
but words that disperse to fill a space,
like breath that weaves the pliant silence
into the warp and woof of music.

 III.

The Wade Center: 2001-2101

The Marion E. Wade Center, September 2001

The Marion E. Wade Center, September 2001

After the months of cement-pouring,
the raising of walls, the bracing
of floors with book-supporting trusses.
After the roofers carefully treading
the sloped surfaces. After the sawdust,
the construction trailers parked behind Edman
in the snow, the temporary front door,
the chimney pots on order, the blueprints
spread on saw-horsed plywood,
the staircases without railings.
After the packing and unpacking of files,
the book boxes stacked six feet high,
the paths between them like a garden maze,
we wander new spaces, pristine,
not yet redolent of concentrated reading,
not yet filled with the rustled silence
of scholars, the children’s corner a mere outline,
Aslan’s portrait leaning against a wall,
Lewis’s bust stashed in a safe corner.

You who follow, you yet unborn,
you will know these spaces for the first time,
too. You will grow familiar, as will we,
with the patterns formed by sunlight
through this glass, with the heft
of the door, with books now older,
their pages brittled by the years.

Think back on us, the new millennium
handed to us like an unproofed book.
You will supply it with words as yet unfleshed,
correcting what we discerned
as mere glimmers and flashes.

Yet you, too, will have your blindnesses.
That “chaos of stark bewilderment” Sayers
saw one Ash Wednesday in the middle
of a century of bones, you will know, too.

Wade Center garden, July 2008.

Wade Center garden, July 2008.

Direct your gaze to the garden,
which to us is no more than the promise soil holds.
There in the nodding daffodils of early spring,
the sweet pea, the day lily, the delphinium
of summer, the phlox and cleome,
the sudden arbor, the rose, the boxwood hedge
precisely trimmed, there you will find
a partial answer to disorder,
the rupture in the stem opening to blossom.

Tum back now to the books before you.
Find there in the uncharted
middle of your life the deep woods
of the Word. You must not hesitate.
Step inside.

– Dr. Jill Peláez Baumgaertner, Professor of English and Dean of Humanities and Theological Studies at Wheaton College, September 8, 2001 for the Dedication of The Marion E. Wade Center

Merry Christmas from the Wade Center

Wade Center staff, volunteers, family members, and student workers at our Christmas party.

From the warm glow of the Wade Center in all its Christmas splendor, we wish you a very Merry Christmas.

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Wade Center Christmas tree

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Wade Center Reading Room

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Grabbing a seat next to the Reading Room fireplace during the cold winter months is a must-do!

THE HOUSE OF CHRISTMAS

By G.K. Chesterton in The Spirit of Christmas: Stories, Poems, Essays. London : Xanadu, 1984.

There fared a mother driven forth
Out of an inn to roam;
In the place where she was homeless
All men are at home.
The crazy stable close at hand,
With shaking timber and shifting sand,
Grew a stronger thing to abide and stand
Than the square stones of Rome.

For men are homesick in their homes,
And strangers under the sun,
And they lay their heads in a foreign land
Whenever the day is done.
Here we have battle and blazing eyes,
And chance and honour and high surprise,
But our homes are under miraculous skies
Where the yule tale was begun.

A Child in a foul stable,
Where the beasts feed and foam;
Only where He was homeless
Are you and I at home;
We have hands that fashion and heads that know,
But our hearts we lost—how long ago!
In a place no chart nor ship can show
Under the sky’s dome.

This world is wild as an old wives’ tale,
And strange the plain things are,
The earth is enough and the air is enough
For our wonder and our war;
But our rest is as far as the fire-drake swings
And our peace is put in impossible things
Where clashed and thundered unthinkable wings
Round an incredible star.

To an open house in the evening
Home shall men come,
To an older place than Eden
And a taller town than Rome.
To the end of the way of the wandering star,
To the things that cannot be and that are,
To the place where God was homeless
And all men are at home.

This happy little G.K. Chesterton Christmas ornament just arrived in the Wade Center's shop! You can also pick up one via the American Chesterton Society.

This happy little G.K. Chesterton Christmas ornament just arrived in the Wade Center’s shop! You can also pick up one via the American Chesterton Society.

December Artifact of the Month: First edition of The Hobbit

One book Tolkien fans always love to see when visiting the Wade Center is our first edition of The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien.

THE HOBBIT first edition

THE HOBBIT by J.R.R. Tolkien. London: Allen and Unwin, 1937. 1st edition, 1st impression. Cover design by J.R.R. Tolkien.

Originally published in 1937, The Hobbit had a quite notable and unusual beginning. Sometime around the summer of 1930, Tolkien recalls sitting at his desk grading examination papers. The work provided his family with some extra income during the summer months. It was a task which was, according to an interview he did for the film “Tolkien in Oxford” (BBC, 1968), “very laborious and unfortunately also very boring.” He recalls that one page of an examination was left blank with nothing to read, and he scribbled on it without knowing why: “In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.” That sentence, the opening line of The Hobbit, has become one of the most famous lines in literature.

Tolkien went on to develop the story as he told it to his four children, and eventually sent it to the publisher Allen and Unwin. Stanley Unwin, the firm’s chairman, believed that children were the best judges of children’s literature and hired his ten-year-old son Rayner to write a review of The Hobbit before officially accepting it for publication. Rayner wrote a very favorable review, stating at the end that “This book, with the help of maps, … is good and should appeal to all children between the ages of 5 and 9.” He received a shilling for his work, and The Hobbit was first published in England on September 21, 1937, with an initial print run of 1,500 copies. C.S. Lewis supported Tolkien by anonymously contributing 2 glowing reviews of the book to The Times in October 1937.

The first printing sold well enough that a second printing was needed before Christmas. Four full-color plates of Tolkien’s own artwork were added for this second printing of 2,300 copies. These Hobbit first editions remain rare to this day and are sought-after collector’s items — most especially due to the unfortunate loss of 423 copies when a London warehouse was bombed by the German Luftwaffe in November 1940 during World War II.

The Wade has both the British (Allen and Unwin, 1937) and American (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1938) first editions of The Hobbit. One of our British first editions (a second impression, “impression” being a term for the number of copies of an edition printed at one time) contains Tolkien’s signature in the front as shown here, perhaps given to someone as a gift.

Tolkien Signature

1st edition of THE HOBBIT signed by J.R.R. Tolkien. Click to enlarge.

The original dust jacket of The Hobbit was illustrated by Tolkien, and similar designs using his artwork appear on modern editions as well.

The-hobbit-first-edition-dust-jacket-book-cover

First edition of THE HOBBIT, dust jacket design by J.R.R. Tolkien.

Enjoyment of The Hobbit continues, and in 2012 the book celebrated its 75th anniversary. This December also marks the release of the last of the Hobbit films in a trilogy by Director Peter Jackson. If you are looking for some special holiday reading, settle in a cozy armchair with a copy of The Hobbit, and enjoy.

For more information on The Hobbit and its various editions, here are some recommended resources:

DID YOU KNOW?
Chapter 5, “Riddles in the Dark,” has a different ending in the first edition than in the current edition. Gollum has quite a different personality. The full text of both editions is available in The Annotated Hobbit as well as The History of The Hobbit (listed above).

November Artifact of the Month: Video footage from Poets’ Corner

One year ago on, November 22, 2013, a ceremony commemorating the 50th anniversary of the death of C.S. Lewis took place at Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey, London. A full gathering of those grateful for the life and work of C.S. Lewis watched the unveiling of a memorial stone in his honor, placing his legacy alongside memorials for over three thousand other men and women revered in the United Kingdom, the Commonwealth, and the English-speaking world.

The Wade Center was very pleased to be able to obtain video footage from the ceremony via a UK-based company filming a documentary on C.S. Lewis, and this video is our featured November “Artifact of the Month.” The film from What Larks Productions Ltd. features unedited footage of the Abbey, ceremony guests arriving and departing, and excerpts from the service itself. Rowan Williams, the former Archbishop of Canterbury, gave the Address.

The complete video is available for viewing at the Wade Center (call number CSL-Y / VR-78), and we are glad to provide a sample of it with this excerpt on YouTube.

The video excerpt includes a reading from the final chapter of Lewis’s The Last Battle by Douglas Gresham (younger stepson of C.S. Lewis), prayer, and the unveiling of the Lewis memorial stone. The participants in the video are shown in the photo below.

Unveiling the memorial stone. L to R:  Gregory Lippiatt (godson of Walter Hooper), Walter Hooper (Trustee and Literary Adviser to the Lewis Estate, and Lewis Scholar), the Very Reverend Dr. John Hall (Dean of Westminster), Dr. Michael Ward (Senior Research Fellow, Blackfriars Hall, Oxford, Lewis scholar, organizer of the Westminster Abbey event, and Wade Board member), and Douglas Gresham (younger stepson of C.S. Lewis).

Unveiling the Lewis memorial stone. L to R: Gregory Lippiatt (godson of Walter Hooper), Walter Hooper (Trustee and Literary Adviser to the Lewis Estate, and Lewis Scholar), the Very Reverend Dr. John Hall (Dean of Westminster), Dr. Michael Ward (Senior Research Fellow, Blackfriars Hall, Oxford, Lewis scholar, organizer of the Westminster Abbey event, and Wade Board member), and Douglas Gresham (younger stepson of C.S. Lewis).

The memorial stone, shown below, contains the following quote by C.S. Lewis: “I believe in Christianity as I believe that the Sun has risen, not only because I see it but because by it I see everything else.”

The quote comes from his address titled “Is Theology Poetry,” which he gave at the Oxford debating society called The Socratic Club on November 6, 1944. Dr. Michael Ward reflected on the meaning of these words in the service program for the ceremony:

“The address was one of many he gave to the Socratic Club, the forum for debate between Christians and non-Christians, of which he was President. Thus the inscription points to his role as an apologist who publicly – and not without professional cost – defended the faith … The sentence is straightforwardly confessional, marking the centrality of his faith at a personal level.”

Dr. Ward served as the organizer of the Poets’ Corner event, is on the Wade’s VII Advisory Board, and has been a member of the Wade Board since September 2007.

Walter Hooper, Trustee and Literary Adviser to the Lewis Estate, and his godson Gregory Lippiatt, placed a floral arrangement by the stone during the dedication. The bouquet contained 64 white roses (one for each year of Lewis’s life), 7 sprigs of holly berries (one for each Narnia book), 3 sprigs of rosemary (one for each book of the Ransom trilogy), and a single red rose (for the medieval poem “Romance of the Rose,” featured in Lewis’s Allegory of Love).

MemorialStone-web

The C.S. Lewis memorial stone, now in Poets’ Corner, Westminster Abbey, London.

In addition to the video footage of the ceremony available through the Wade Center, a number of related resources surrounding the anniversary’s events can be found online. An audio excerpt from the Poets’ Corner ceremony is available here. The first words of the recording are of C.S. Lewis himself from one of his BBC Radio broadcasts which later became the book Mere Christianity. This excerpt is from “Beyond Personality: The New Men.”

The Westminster Abbey Institute also sponsored a C.S. Lewis Symposium on November 21, the day before the memorial stone ceremony. Audio recordings of the talks from the symposium are available via the links below:

Telling the Truth through Rational Argument by Alister McGrath

Telling the Truth through Imaginative Fiction by Malcolm Guite

Panel Discussion: What can 21st Century Apologetics learn from C.S. Lewis? Chaired by Michael Ward